Strangers No Longer-Together on the Journey of Hope

Click the link to read "A Pastoral Letter Concerning Migration from the Catholic Bishops of Mexico and the United States"

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Eucharistic Adoration Sts. Peter & Paul has a Holy Hour from 6:00-8:00 pm on the third Wednesdays of the month. The Sacrament of Penance will be offered.

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Saints Peter and Paul Catholic Church has a very rich history that dates back to the year 1850, when Archbishop John Baptist Purcell founded a new parish. Our desire as a parish is to continue to minister to the local community and to shine as a welcoming beacon for all.

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First Friday Devotion to the Sacred Heart

Everyone is invited to OLSH for devotions to the Sacred Heart of Jesus on the First Fridays of each month. The Holy Sacrifice of the Mass starts at 6:30 pm, followed by Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament and devotional prayers. The Sacrament of Reconciliation will be offered during this time. The evening concludes at 8:00 pm with prayers of consecration to the Sacred Heart and Benediction.

A Letter From Archbishop Schnurr

A Letter From Archbishop Schnurr

Dear Friends in Christ,

On Tuesday of this week, a Pennsylvania Grand Jury released a report detailing the names of 301 priests who sexually abused over 1,000 minors over a 70-year period in that state. This report, coupled with the recent revelations regarding the former Cardinal Theodore McCarrick, shocks, saddens, and angers Catholics everywhere, including myself. The depth of depravity and evil described in these reports is stunning. No words can diminish the level of revulsion one feels at reading them.

From the depths of my heart, I am sorry for the terrible pain and suffering experienced by the victims of abuse throughout their lives. I am sorry for the deep shame that Catholic lay people rightfully feel at the inexcusable behavior of certain cardinals, bishops, and priests, the emotional exhaustion of having to defend their faith to friends and co-workers, and the discouragement of having to relive a deep tragedy that we all hoped was behind us. I am sorry for the stigma that good and holy priests who are committed to their vocation and vows have to endure wherever they go. I am sorry for the trust that has collectively been violated.

The Archdiocese of Cincinnati is unequivocally committed to the protection of all people, children and adults, involved with any of our various ministries. At this time, there are no active cases of clerical abuse of minors anywhere in the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. If you suspect abuse on the part of any agent of the Archdiocese, please report it to the appropriate civil authorities, as well as to the Coordinator of Ministry to Survivors of Abuse in the Archdiocese at 513-263-6623 or 1-800-686-2724, ext. 6623. If you see something, please say something.

Since 1993, the Archdiocese has embraced and promulgated the Decree on Child Protection, which now also covers vulnerable adults, including:

Complete background checks on all clerics, employees and volunteers;
Ongoing required training for clerics, employees, and volunteers on recognizing the signs of abuse of children and vulnerable adults;
Procedures for reporting suspected abuse;
Immediately reporting all allegations of abuse to the appropriate civil authorities;
A Child Protection Review Board that is comprised primarily of lay people;
Training of children in Catholic schools and religious education programs on warning signs and appropriate responses for their own protection; and
Onsite independent audit of policies and procedures by an outside firm.
The Archdiocese of Cincinnati is committed to transparency. To that end, for the past 15 years, we have published the names and status of all priests credibly accused of abuse on the archdiocesan website. This can be found at http://www.catholiccincinnati.org/protecting-children/resources-and-publications/status-report-on-clerics-accused-of-child-abuse/.

The Archdiocese is also committed to ensuring that the men who will be ordained to the priesthood are indeed suitable for ministry in the Church and worthy of the trust of the Catholic faithful. Every applicant to the seminary undergoes a full battery of psychological testing prior to acceptance into the seminary program. Once accepted, the candidate has, at a minimum, four years of formation in which he is taught what he needs to know in order to be a priest. During this time, his disposition, behavior, self-awareness, and stability and goodness of character are also evaluated. When a man discerns that God might be calling him to the priesthood, the Church has a duty to discern that call as well, to make sure he is truly called and of the right character to serve faithfully and well.

Many of you may be feeling that Jesus has forsaken the Church. This is not true. Rather, some members of the Church have forsaken Jesus and the call to be disciples. Jesus established His Church on earth and promised to never leave us. As we know from the Gospel of John, “the light shines in the darkness, and the darkness has not overcome it” (Jn 1:5).

Today, Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo, president of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, announced the foundation of a plan (included below) to comprehensively address the issue of abuse and the failure in leadership among our bishops. This plan will include the active involvement of both the laity and the Holy See. I pledge my personal dedication to this effort and to keeping you informed of its progress.

Please join me in praying for the healing of all victims of the grave sin of sexual abuse. May the Blessed Virgin Mary, patroness of the Catholic Church in the United States, continue to intercede for us. May the Holy Spirit continue to guide and protect us.

Most Reverend Dennis M. Schnurr
Archbishop of Cincinnati